Search
LIST OF ARTICLES

PDF of individual article can be purchased from Palm Information Centre, MPOB
Tel: 603-8769 4928 Fax: 603-8925 4213 Email: palmoils@mpob.gov.my

Article Info

No. 127 (Apr - Jun 2018) p56
Datasheet
Ir Ravi Menon*

Download Article

Abstract


Datasheet

-



Keyword(s):

Download Full Issue

Article Info

No. 127 (Apr - Jun 2018) p51-53
Static Walking Steriliser-Future Sterilisers
Ng Keng Phoy*

Download Article

Abstract


Static Walking Steriliser-Future Sterilisers

The most common fresh fruit bunch (FFB) sterilisation system used in a palm oil mill is still the conventional horizontal type. In this system, a few cages are filled with (FFB) and pushed into each steriliser which is actually unfired pressure vessels. Steam at 3 barg is admitted to the FFB laden cages for a period of 90 minutes. The first 10 min were for de-aeration during which the air contained in the steriliser chamber is driven out during the scheduled three blow-off cycles.



Keyword(s):

Download Full Issue

Article Info

No. 127 (Apr - Jun 2018) p38-44
Application of Regenerated Spent Bleaching Earth as Adsorbent for Treatment of Palm Oil Mill Effluent
Rusnani Abd Majid* and Che Rahmat Che Mat

Download Article

Abstract


Application of Regenerated Spent Bleaching Earth as Adsorbent for Treatment of Palm Oil Mill Effluent

The aim of the present study is to evaluate adsorption capacity of regenerated spent bleaching earth, to decolourise and reduce the biological oxygen demand (BOD) of final discharged of palm oil mill effluent (POME). Different types of spent bleaching earth were used in this study; regenerated using acid and heat treatment after de-oiling (RDSBEAH), spent bleaching earth (SBE), de-oiled spent bleaching earth (DSBE) and new bleaching earth (NBE). Prior to the study, samples were characterised for their surface area, pore volume and functional groups. RDSBE-AH was found to have the highest surface area and pore volume when compared to the other three types of clays with values of 122.3 m2 g-1 and 68 cm3 g-1, respectively. For the decolourisation of POME, RDSBE-AH exhibited higher efficiency than NBE. Higher BOD reduction efficiency was found for NBE as compared to RDSBE-AH. The results demonstrated that the regenerated SBE, activated using combined acid and heat treatments, capable to decolourise and reduce the BOD of the POME final discharge, to comply with the stringent new proposed limits by Department of Environment (DOE).



Keyword(s): adsorption; biological oxygen demand (BOD); decolourisation; palm oil mill effluent (POME); regenerated spent bleaching earth

Download Full Issue

Article Info

No. 127 (Apr - Jun 2018) p25-30, 35
Bio-based Products from Palm Oil Mill Effluent
Stasha Eleanor Rosland Abel*; Soh Kheang Loh and Nasrin Abu Bakar

Download Article

Abstract


Bio-based Products from Palm Oil Mill Effluent

A surplus of palm oil mill effluent (POME) is generated annually. POME - a by-product from the palm oil milling process - is often regarded as a highly polluting wastewater although its high organic load can be economically beneficial. In average, about 0.67-1 t of POME is produced for every t of fresh fruit bunches (FFB) processed. Despite the negative perception on POME, it has great potential to be reutilised as a renewable source for making into various value-added products e.g. citric acid, bioethanol, biohydrogen, bioplastic, among others, through biotechnological approaches. The advantages of bioprocessing of POME include a reduced production cost, environmental impact associated with palm oil processing and energy consumption. This paper reviews some of the recent biotechnological advances in waste (POME)-to-wealth (bioproducts) generation which then promote sustainable palm oil production.



Keyword(s):

Download Full Issue

Article Info

No. 127 (Apr - Jun 2018) p11-15
Determination of Levoglucosan Compounds in Pyrolysis Oil of Empty Fruit Bunches and its Potential Application
Mohamad Azri Sukiran*; Soh Kheang Loh* and Nasrin Abu Bakar*

Download Article

Abstract


Determination of Levoglucosan Compounds in Pyrolysis Oil of Empty Fruit Bunches and its Potential Application

Generally, pyrolysis is one of the most promising technologies for biomass utilisation. It is essential in the first stage thermochemical conversion of biomass into bio-oil, bio-char and gases dependent on process conditions in complete absence of oxygen. Usually, pyrolysis occurs at moderate temperature (400°C to 700°C) with rapid heating (Abnisa et al., 2013). It is mainly used for optimising liquid products at high heating and heattransfer rates using finely ground biomass. Nitrogen (N2) - an inert gas - is commonly used to accelerate vapours sweeping from the hot zone (pyrolysis zone) through the cool zone (condenser). Condensation is an important step for liquid production during pyrolysis. Without this, only the biochar and gas products can be obtained from the process. Once the pyrolysis vapours are condensed, a dark brown liquid is formed, namely bio-oil or pyrolysis oil. The bio-oil yield can be up to 80% of the initial dry mass (Bridgwater and Peacocke, 2000).



Keyword(s):

Download Full Issue

Article Info

No. 126 (Jan - Mar 2018) p38-44
Palm Oil Mill Odour Emission
Andrew Yap Kian Chung*

Download Article

Abstract


Palm Oil Mill Odour Emission

Anaerobic treatment of palm oil mill effluent (POME) emits various odorous chemicals. Thus, Department of Environment under the jurisdiction of the Air Division has proposed odour limit of 12 000 OU m-3 for palm oil mills in the draft odour regulation recently. Three mills with differing effluent treatment systems were selected to carry out the odour study in order to validate the proposal. Field survey results showed that the odour emission sources in all mills exceeded the proposed odour limits However, in-field odour concentrations in treatment plant areas are well below the limit. Mill with digester tank has lowest in-field odour concentrations in treatment plant areas compared to mill with covered lagoon while open ponding has the highest readings.



Keyword(s):

Download Full Issue

Article Info

No. 126 (Jan - Mar 2018) p25-28, 33-36
Lignocellulose-derived Sugars from Oil Palm Biomass
Nurul Adela Bukhari*; Soh Kheang Loh*; Nasrin Abu Bakar* and Jamaliah Md Jahim**

Download Article

Abstract


Lignocellulose-derived Sugars from Oil Palm Biomass

Lignocellulosic biomass is an interesting option as a source of fermentable sugars for the production of biofuels and biochemicals considering its abundant availability and low-cost compared to commercially available refined sugars. One such major lignocellulosic biomass available in Malaysia is empty fruit bunches (EFB) which is a by-product from the palm oil milling process. Besides, the oil palm plantations also generate a large amount of oil palm trunk (OPT) and oil palm frond (OPF) during replanting and pruning. The annual production of EFB, OPT and OPF is approximately 84.23 million tonne (dry basis) a year (Table 1) from 5.74 million hectare of oil palm planted area (MPOB, 2016). This huge amount (i.e. 7 million t of EFB, 21.4 million t of OPT and 55.8 million t of OPF) implies that oil palm biomass is a readily available feedstock to provide intermediate platforms (xylose, C5 and glucose, C6 sugars) for the production of biofuels and biochemicals.



Keyword(s):

Download Full Issue

Article Info

No. 126 (Jan - Mar 2018) p11-17
Development of Biogas Upgrading Plant for the Production of Bio-Compressed Natural Gas (Bio-CNG) in Palm Oil Mills
Nasrin Abu Bakar*; Soh Kheang Loh*; Astimar Abdul Aziz*; Mohamed Fazil Mohamad Saad**; Mohd Kamahl M Kamarudin**; Lew Yan Soon *** and Lim Daw Yuen***

Download Article

Abstract


Development of Biogas Upgrading Plant for the Production of Bio-Compressed Natural Gas (Bio-CNG) in Palm Oil Mills

Palm oil mill effluent (POME) is a high-strength organic wastewater generated from the extraction of crude palm oil (CPO) from fresh fruit bunches (FFB) in palm oil mills. The wastewater is treated conventionally via a series of ponding systems involving anaerobic and aerobic microbial processes. Anaerobic digestion (AD) is the most commonly used method by the palm oil industry to treat POME to an acceptable level as set by the local authority before finally discharge to a watercourse, or for land application. This treatment process generates and emits huge quantities of biogas uncontrollably to the atmosphere. At a production rate of 28 m3 biogas for every m3 of POME, it was estimated that 1562 million m3 of biogas was generated from 85.84 million t of FFB processed in 456 palm oil mills nationwide in 2016 (MPOB, 2017).



Keyword(s):

Download Full Issue

Article Info

No. 125 (Oct - Dec 2017) p55
Datasheet
N Ravi Menon

Download Article

Abstract


Datasheet

-



Keyword(s):

Download Full Issue

Article Info

No. 125 (Oct - Dec 2017) p37-42
The Use of Boiler Fly Ash for BOD, TSS and Colour Reduction of Palm Oil Mill Effluent
Rusnani Abd Majid* and Hisham Esa*

Download Article

Abstract


The Use of Boiler Fly Ash for BOD, TSS and Colour Reduction of Palm Oil Mill Effluent

Environmental quality, such as soil, water and air pollution is becoming a public concern in Malaysia as this can be expected when the country moves towards industrialisation. There are various types of * Malaysian Palm Oil Board, 6, Persiaran Institusi, Bandar Baru Bangi, 43000 Kajang, Selangor, Malaysia. E-mail: rusnani@mpob.gov.my industries that emit pollutants into the air as well as discharge wastewater or effluent into water course or land application. One of the main contributors of organic pollution is from the palm oil industry. With the increase in the number of palm oil mills in Malaysia with a total of 453 mills in 2016, the country’s economy has also increased significantly. At the same time, large volume of effluent and solid waste is also being generated.



Keyword(s):

Download Full Issue

© Malaysian Palm Oil Board (MPOB). All Rights reserved.
No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system,
in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise, without prior written permission of the publisher.

This online publication is electronically compiled by Palm Information Centre, Malaysian Palm Oil Board (MPOB)
Page 1 of 46

Menu

Popular Titles

BOOKS e-BOOKS e-JOURNALS
   Updated on 1 September 2018  

Subscribed Resources

e-RESOURCES

e-BOOKS 

 

2018 SUBSCRIBED TITLES

USER GUIDE

Updated on 1 September 2018

Portal Survey

Your opinion about PALMOILIS website?

Daily CPO Prices

Quick Links


                 


      

              
Copyright © 2018 PALMOILIS Portal. All Rights Reserved.
Designed & Developed by Palm Information Centre, MPOB. Contact webmaster

Visitor Counter

061918
TodayToday80
YesterdayYesterday90
This WeekThis Week49
This MonthThis Month866
All DaysAll Days61918