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Article Info

No. 107 (Apr - June 2013) p9-18
Measuring Woes Associated with MSPO Audit Compliance
N Ravi Menon

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Abstract


Measuring Woes Associated with MSPO Audit Compliance

Measurements associated with palm oil extraction process are often categorised as some- thing difficult, if not impossible by some palm oil mill owners and its top management. They often underestimate the importance of accurate measurement of product losses in order to improve the over- all performance of the mill operation ultimately leading to improved productivity. As today’s technology has a lot to offer with the vast product line that is at our disposal to choose from, millers are in a better position than what it was a few decades ago. However, the new technologies for product quality and process efficiency do not seem to be penetrating the palm oil industry fast enough to match the rapid change that is taking place in other edible product processing plants. Any suggestions to improve the prevailing obsolete mill practices are often met with recalcitrant responses that appear to be based more for the sake of opposing rather than based on clear thinking. Even a simple suggestion to tighten the steam joints to prevent steam leakage, in essence a good milling practice, is misconstrued as imposing additional burden on the millers claiming that it will require the measurement of the leaking steam and that it is almost an impossible task. If there is steam blowing out from a lange joint, the natural thing any miller would do is to tighten the bolts on the lange coupling. There is no necessity to quantify the steam that has blown out. No miller would like to produce the steam and allow it to leak not because it will increase the greenhouse gas (GHG) and cost of production. The focal point is why produce something and waste it. In this article, an attempt is made to disseminate to the industry some of the com- mon-sense approaches to regulate wastage of resource materials. Some simple measuring techniques are also recommended for quantifying essential by-products and losses for improving the overall milling efficiency.



Keyword(s):

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Article Info

No.106 (Jan - Mar 2013) p35
Datasheet
-

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Abstract


Datasheet

- Physical properties of crude palm oil - Other relevant physical properties - Apparent densities for refinded, bleached and deodorised palm oil



Keyword(s): CRUDE PALM OIL; RBD PALM OIL; PHYSICAL PROPERTIES

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Article Info

No.106 (Jan - Mar 2013) p27-30
Palm Oil Processing in Brazil: How It is Managed?
Ma Ah Ngan

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Abstract


Palm Oil Processing in Brazil: How It is Managed?

This is an interesting article about the way palm oil processing was carried out in Brazil. Malaysian millers will certainly gain some insight by reading this article. This article is a summary of the findings of a team of research officers from the then Palm Oil Research Institute of Malaysia (PORIM) who visited a palm oil mill in Brazil in August 1997 to study their method of palm oil milling. It was compiled by Dr Ma Ah Ngan who was part of the team and was published in 1977. Mr Hararld Brunckhorst, Managing Director of AGROPALMA S/A, arranged the visit. The mill, Agropalma S/A, located at Belem, Brazil was a 100% Brazilian own corporation. It owned some 45 000 ha of land but only allowed to plant 16 000 ha with oil palm, 2000 ha for infrastructure, which includes two palm oil mills, laboratories, offices, a school and health-assistance units, while the rest are preserved as forest under the strict Brazilian law.



Keyword(s): PALM OIL PROCESSING -Brazil; STERILIZATION; PALM OIL - Quality; OER

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Article Info

No.106 (Jan - Mar 2013) p16-19
Self-dependent Mini Mills
Andrew Yap Kian Chung* and N Ravi Menon*

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Abstract


Self-dependent Mini Mills

All the mills in Malaysia were set up to serve plantations that are fairly large and can produce sufficient crop for a mill capable of processing at least 20 t hr-1. This processing capacity would produce sufficient fuel for generating the required heat and power for the mill and as such may be termed an optimum sized self-supporting palm oil mill. Unfortunately, these mills used boilers and steam turbines that were custom-made to operate with minimum efficiency to address the issue of costly biomass disposal by burning it as a fuel in boilers. These boilers also doubled up as incinerators to burn away the surplus biomass. Unfortunately, nothing was done to find out the capacity of the smallest self-supporting mill. A new focus would invariably uncover new research areas where emphasis will be focused on maximum fuel efficiency and minimum waste. This article explores all the areas that would contribute in one way or other towards the development of the smallest self-supporting mini mill that can serve small plantations operating in isolation.



Keyword(s): PALM OIL MILLS; MINI MILLS; FUEL EFFICIENCY

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Article Info

No.105 (Oct - Dec 2012) p39
Datasheet - Approximate mass balance in a 10 t hr-1 fresh fruit bunches (FFB) processing mill
-

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Abstract


Datasheet - Approximate mass balance in a 10 t hr-1 fresh fruit bunches (FFB) processing mill

DATASHEET



Keyword(s): DATASHEET; FRESH FRUIT BUNCH (FFB); MASS BALANCE; ENGINEERING AND PROCESSING

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Article Info

No.105 (Oct - Dec 2012) p35-38
Significance of Oil Extraction Rate (OER) Efficiency in a Palm Oil Mill
N Ravi Menon

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Abstract


Significance of Oil Extraction Rate (OER) Efficiency in a Palm Oil Mill

The other day, a mill manager contacted us to say that his boss was always finding fault with him when the oil loss was on the high side. His boss, the General Manager, was a planter by profession but was vested with the mandate to monitor mill operations as well. As the General Manager was always finding fault with the mill manager and turned a deaf ear to his explanations, he was contemplating on resigning and taking up a job overseas. We told to him to hold on and find out a way to make him understand the factors involved. This could be a tough job as another factor called ego also played a vital role in this. If the General Manager said that the total mill process loss should have been below 1.5%, it should have been applicable in all the mills. He had a point there, but not a valid one as there were other factors he had overlooked.  As  this  issue  is  widespread  among the organisations, where the plantation managers take charge of the mills, we thought Perhaps we should make some clarifications for the planters to carefully consider the relevant reasoning behind the rational that oil losses are a function of the oil extraction ratio. Surprisingly,  even the mill engineers are not aware of this simple truth.  In order to justify this statement, some definitions would be of help.



Keyword(s): PALM OIL; OIL EXTRACTION RATE (OER); OIL EXTRACTION EFFICIENCY

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Article Info

No.105 (Oct - Dec 2012) p21-28, 33
Introduction to Malaysian Sustainable Palm Oil (MSPO)
N Ravi Menon

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Abstract


Introduction to Malaysian Sustainable Palm Oil (MSPO)

The following is the draft proposal of the forthcoming Malaysian Sustainable Palm Oil (MSPO) audit programme tailored for the mills. It has been presented to the industry for comments.



Keyword(s): MALAYSIAN SUSTAINABLE PALM OIL (MSPO); MILLERS; INTERNAL AUDIT; SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY

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Article Info

No.105 (Oct - Dec 2012) p9 - 16
Coalescing Clarifier for Crude Palm Oil Clarification
Mohamad Sulong; Ronnie C W Tan and Krisada Chavananand

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Abstract


Coalescing Clarifier for Crude Palm Oil Clarification

When oil passes through interspaces between the coalescence plate separator plate, it imparts shear forces to the small oil particles causing them to agglomerate, thereby preventing the formation of emulsion. As a result, the diameter of the oil particles become large and separation efficiency improves.



Keyword(s): CRUDE PALM OIL; CLARIFICATION; OIL SEPARATOR

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Article Info

No.104 (July - Sept 2012) p49
Datasheet : Standard milling product losses
-

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Abstract


Datasheet : Standard milling product losses

DATASHEET



Keyword(s): DATASHEET

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Article Info

No.104 (July - Sept 2012) p33-36; 41-42
Achieving a BOD below 20 mg litre-1 for POME: is it a myth or a reality?
TAN, Ronnie C.W.

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Abstract


Achieving a BOD below 20 mg litre-1 for POME: is it a myth or a reality?

There are a number of effluent treatment systems available now in the market claiming to give excellent results. This could be a valid claim because in most cases it would have performed satisfactorily with other types of effluents. But the problem often overlooked is the dissimilar characteristics of different types of effluents. Each treatment system has to be separately evolved and custom made to be effective. It could be a costly mistake if we blindly adopt a system with a proven track record of effluent treatment when dealing with another industry. One of the critical characteristics of palm oil mill effluent is its extraordinarily high biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), that can be as high as 30 000 mg litre-1. Currently, most mills are struggling to keep it below the existing Department of Environment (DOE) limit of 100 mg litres-1. Soon this will have to be lowered to 20 mg litres-1 to keep pace with the rest of the world. Recently, a new method called the biological chemical mechanical and membrane (BCMM) technology has been tried out under R&D in MPOB Palm Oil Mill Technology Centre (August 2010 – February 2011) and in FELDA's Kilang Sawit Neram (January – August 2012), that seemed to deliver consistent results under the normal mill operating conditions.



Keyword(s): PALM OIL MILL EFFLUENT (POME) ; BIOCHEMICAL OXYGEN DEMAND (BOD) ; BIOLOGICAL CHEMICAL MECHANICAL and MEMBRANE (BCMM) ; MPOB PUBLICATIONS

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© Malaysian Palm Oil Board (MPOB). All Rights reserved.
No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system,
in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise, without prior written permission of the publisher.

This online publication is electronically compiled by Palm Information Centre, Malaysian Palm Oil Board (MPOB)
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